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UPDATED JUN 2017 CLOCKS FOR SALE ME - CONTACT

BREITLING 618 24 AND 12 HOURS

This clocks previous to the 651 model used in B-727 were used in several planes as DC-7, B-707, Lockheed L-188 Electra, Convair Coronado etc, each company choose the cockpit instrumentation and therefore the cock.

The DC-6 (left bottom) Originally intended as a military transport near the end of World War II, it was reworked after the war to compete with the Lockheed Constellation in the long-range commercial transport market. It was built between 1946 and 1949 and it is essentially a streched, more powerful, and pressurized version of the DC-4, the only exterior difference between DC-4 and DC-6 are the fuselage windows in DC-6 they are square while in DC-4 they are porthole style.

The DC-7 (right bottom), is 3 feet 4 inches longer and with a more powerfull engines that makes it basically an intercontinental aircraft. It was built since 1953 till 1958, shortly before the first jet powered airlines as DC-8 and B-707. The only difference between DC-6 and DC-7 is the number of bladrs in engines 4 blades in DC-7 , and 3 in the DC-6.

 

The Lockheed L-188 Electra was built between 1957 and 1961 to complete the requarements of American Airlines, the good start of sales was interrupted by 3 serious accidents between 1959 and 1960 that forced a costly program to develop aircraft modification to correct a design failure that led to the cessation of the production. This aircraft was the model for the development of P-3 Orion maritime patrol still today in service.

 

BREITLING RADAR SHELTER WALL CLOCK

This clock called “radar shelter wall clock”, is exactly the same as the one aircraft built named 118-12-24. The only difference is that this one has two glass-attached hands to be able to fix the take off time.

I found it in a portable weather station, possibly from a “movil” a portable control tower that was situated at the side of the active runway, it guides the airplanes in the traffic circuit of the airport. It is mostly used when several airplanes are exercising landings and taking offs. The workload at the tower rose during these periods and it was helped by the movil.

This Breitling was situated between the wind indicator and an intensity indicator. These three instruments were located in a wooden box with a deplorable aspect. No wonder no one wanted it. After cleaning the exterior of the clock, it seemed to be in good conditions. The balance staff was broken but fortunately it’s the same as the one for the 651 the clock of the B-727, and I had one.

 

 

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