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UPDATED JUN 2017 CLOCKS FOR SALE ME - CONTACT

VOUGHT F4U CORSAIR - HAMILTON ELGIN 37500

 

THE CLOCK

After the disaster suffered at Pearl Harbor, on the seventh of December of 1942, Hamilton, like many other companies, changed their whole production to follow the requirements of the US Army. The “Bureau of Aeronautics” wanted two sources supplying a clock with elapsed time. The result made Elgin and Hamilton cooperate in the process of designing and building this elapsed time clock.

It is the most complicated clock ever built for an airplane. It contains 417 pieces, 248 different, double barrel with power for eight days, 16 jewels.

it indicates time, elapsed time, chronometer with 60 minutes counter and date. In this clock for the very first time was introduced a new system that allows to set the time backwards through midnight without affecting the date system.

 

THE PLANE

What calls attention the most in this plane is his seagull shape wing. This weird shape is due to its need to separate the propeller from the ground. The propeller is the biggest one ever mounted in a single-seated plane.

Corsair was originally designed to be used in aircraft carriers, but it had some problems. Taking off was unstable and it has a strong tendency to bouncing at landing.

Due to this problem and the great difficulty for landing in a carrier for the average navy pilot, the NAVY declared Corsairs not appropriate for an aircraft carrier.

The US NAVY despite the superiority of the Corsair, equipped the carriers with F6F Hellcats. The Hellcat was more simple, noble, and cheap (3 Corsairs cost the same as 5 Hellcats). The following versions of the Corsair improved the bouncing tendency, and pilot visibility.

In 1944 it was cleared for deck operations. Its production ended in 1947 and reached its highest point in 1945 (300 planes were built every month).

With the most powerful engine, Corsairs was the fastest fighter at the time. 2.140 knock downs were attributed to the Corsair while only 190 Corsairs were knocked down. Half of them were not attributed to combat.

Charles Lindberg, the first person to fly across the Atlantic by himself. flew the Navy Corsairs. He tested the power of the bombs and its use. During practice he bombed the Japanese in the battle over the Marshall Island.

This plane was responsible for the strikes against the German battleship “Tirpiz”.

The F4U Corsair was used in the war against Korea as a night fighter and continued to be used until 1957.

 

THE COCKPIT

The cockpit was situated behind the central gas tank, making the pilot be seated behind the wings. This made the front vision complicated. In the later versions, the seat was raised to be able to have a better view, but this made to change the canopy and therefore the aiming system, which was reflected on the glass of the cockpit instead of in the gun sight.

Another curiosity about being seated behind the wings was: when the pilot pulled the stick to make the plane go up, the pilot first went down, making a strange situation that pilots took a while to get adapted to.

Every pilot that flew this plane had to be very careful not to drop the map or the pen because these planes had no floor. Anything that was dropped after gear extension was never seen again. In the later versions the plane was made with floor.

The front instrument panel was the typical one of the NAVY, but the sides were a mess of cables, controls, switches, etc that bothered themselves. Some switches weren't visible and many were hidden under the guide rail of the cockpit's dome.

   

F4U  CORSAIR´S   ACES

ROBERT M. HANSON

First ace of the F4U in the II WW with 25 shot downs. Out of those 25, 20 were produced in 6 days in a row. He was once taken down by a Zero, and after being 6 hours in a lifeboat he was rescued by a destructor. His plane crashed against the sea while he was in an escort mission, he was declared killed in combat.

 

GUY BORDELON

He was the only ace of the War of Korea. In his second cruise in 9 months was made in the USS Princeton. They flew 3 out of 4 days if the weather conditions permitted it, he fourth was used by the aircraft carrier to reload fuel, ammo, kerosene for the planes, etc. He flew different kinds of night missions aboard the Corsair. He intercepted and shot down 5 Russian planes becoming the last ace of the propeller aircrafts times.

 

 

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